Shooting in Chinatown leaves two critically injured; suspects injured in car chase

People walk through Chinatown in Boston, Mass.

On April 17, two men in their 30s were shot in Chinatown, leaving them in need of critical medical attention. Officers responded to shots fired around 2:35 a.m. around Beach and Hudson Street, where they found two victims with life-threatening injuries who were then escorted to local hospitals. 

Police spokesman Officer Andre Watson claimed that a “disturbance or altercation” preluded the shooting, but little is yet to be revealed of the source of the violence. 

Police gave a description of the vehicle the shooters drove, which was seen fleeing the scene; it was said to be a Honda Odyssey minivan. The vehicle was soon seen shortly after on the intersection of Atlantic Avenue and Kneeland Street. When officers attempted to pull over the car it did not stop but sped up, leading the police on a chase. The car ran multiple red lights and made its way from Chinatown to Charlestown over the North Washington Street Bridge.  

Upon entering Charlestown, the driver lost control of the vehicle at the Sullivan Square rotary, knocking the vehicle onto its side on a grassy section surrounding the rotary. Three men were found in the vehicle and were brought to local hospitals for treatment. Along with the suspects, a gun and ammunition were also discovered in the car.

Only two out of the three men found in the car have been charged: 23-year-old Ven Bunton of Lowell, Mass. and 24-year-old Alexio Carmello-Marquez of Tampa, Fla.

Bunton’s charges include: “unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful possession of ammunition, two counts of assault and battery with intent to murder, two counts of assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon, failure to stop for police, reckless operation [of] a motor vehicle, and operation of a motor vehicle without a license,” according to The Boston Globe.  

Carmello-Marquez’s charges include: “unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful possession of ammunition, assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon, and being a fugitive from justice,” per The Boston Globe. 

Both Bunton and Carmello-Marquez are being held without bail until their dangerousness hearing on Friday, April 22, at 11 a.m. A dangerousness hearing occurs when “the prosecution requests a judge to hold a defendant without bail for up to 120 days,” according to dellisonlaw.com. In Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 276, Section 58A, it states that “the commonwealth may move, based on dangerousness, for an order of pretrial detention or release on conditions for a felony offense that has as an element of the offense the use, attempted use or threatened use of physical force against the person of another or any other felony that, by its nature, involves a substantial risk that physical force against the person of another may result." This description aligns with the incidents of April 17.

Kevin Hayden, the Suffolk District Attorney, extended his praise to Boston officers—after seeing the scene for himself—for handling what, in his words, could have been a “potentially deadly situation from beginning to end.”

Hayden passed commentary on the violence within the city that we’ve seen in this case and many others over the past few months: “Once again we have bullets flying on a Boston street, victims clinging to life, and police acting fast to apprehend individuals who not only had guns but had just demonstrated no hesitation to use them. We’ll continue to prosecute the people who use guns and the people who supply them.” 

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